PASE: Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon England

Domesday

[Image: Excerpt from the Domesday Book]
[Image: Durham Liber Vitae, folio 38r (extract)]

Bædling 2 Bædling ‘of Truleigh’ (Suss.), fl. 1066

Male
Author: CPL
Editorial Status: 4 of 5

Discussion of the name

Summary

          

Bædling 2 held a 6-hide manor worth almost £5 of Earl Godwine, and should be reckoned as having been one of the earl’s thegns before Godwine’s death in 1053.

Distribution map of property and lordships associated with this name in DB

List of property and lordships associated with this name in DB

           

Holder 1066

Shire Phil. ref. Vill Holder 1066 DB Spelling Holder 1066 Lord 1066 Tenant-in-Chief 1086 1086 subtenant Fiscal value 1066 value 1086 value Holder 1066 ID conf. Show on map
Sussex 12,28 Perching Bellinc Bædling 'of Truleigh' Godwine, earl William de Warenne Tezelin 'of Fulking' 2.00 0.95 0.95 A Map
Sussex 13,6 Truleigh Bedling Bædling 'of Truleigh' Godwine, earl William de Briouze William 'the man of William de Briouze' 3.50 3.50 3.06 A Map
Sussex 13,6 Truleigh Bedling Bædling 'of Truleigh' Godwine, earl William de Briouze William 'the man of William de Briouze' 0.50 0.50 0.44 A Map
Total               6.00 4.95 4.45  

Profile

   

The name Bædling occurs twice in DB with rather different spellings which might not otherwise have been connected were it not for the fact that DB explicitly says that 2 hides at Perching (held by Bellinc from Earl Godwine) used to lie in Truleigh (held by Bedling from Earl Godwine). Bædling’s manor had been divided when a new rape was created for William de Braose c. 1073, disrupting territorial arrangements across the new demarcation line with William de Warenne’s rape of Lewes.

Bædling’s manor of Truleigh-Perching (as it might be called) was in fact disposed in two blocks of land separated by a strip of other men’s property. The larger unit we are concerned with here was the later parish of Edburton, which occupied a section 3 miles long and 2 miles wide straddling the north-facing escarpment of the South Downs and the fertile greensand valley below. In 1066 there were four blocks of land within Edburton, running in parallel along the same alignment: from west to east Truleigh (4 hides), Paythorne (4 hides), Perching (divided among holdings of 2, 3, and 5½ hides), and Fulking (3¼ hides) (Suss. 12:26–29, 35; 13:6). The new rape boundary not only diverted Bædling’s two blocks of land to different Norman owners, but also cut Paythorne in two: 2½ hides in Braose’s rape and 1½ hides in Warenne’s (VCH Suss. VI (3), 45–51; VCH Suss. VII, 202–4).

Bibliography

    

VCH Suss. VI (3): The Victoria History of the Counties of England: A History of the County of Sussex, VI, Part 3, ed. T. P. Hudson (London: Oxford University Press for the Institute of Historical Research, 1987)

VCH Suss. VII: The Victoria History of the Counties of England: The Victoria History of the County of Sussex, VII, ed. L. F. Salzman (London: Oxford University Press for the Institute of Historical Research, 1940)

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