PASE: Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon England

Domesday

[Image: Excerpt from the Domesday Book]
[Image: Durham Liber Vitae, folio 38r (extract)]

Almund 3 ‘of Rylstone’ (Yorks. WR), fl. 1066

Male
Author: CPL
Editorial Status: 4 of 5

Discussion of the name

Summary

Almund 3 was a modestly well-off thegn with three estates assessed at 11 carucates in the Yorkshire Dales. Their value before 1066 is unknown because they were recorded as waste in 1086.

Distribution map of property and lordships associated with this name in DB

List of property and lordships associated with this name in DB

Holder 1066

Shire Phil. ref. Vill Holder 1066 DB Spelling Holder 1066 Lord 1066 Tenant-in-Chief 1086 1086 subtenant Fiscal value 1066 value 1086 value Holder 1066 ID conf. Show on map
Yorkshire 29W39 Rylstone Almunt Almund 'of Rylstone' - Dolfin 'of Rylstone' - 4.00 0.00 0.00 B Map
Yorkshire 29W40 Hartlington Almunt Almund 'of Rylstone' - Dolfin 'of Rylstone' - 1.00 0.00 0.00 B Map
Yorkshire 30W10 Arnford Almund Almund 'of Rylstone' - Roger the Poitevin - 2.00 0.00 0.00 B Map
Yorkshire 30W10 Wigglesworth Almund Almund 'of Rylstone' - Roger the Poitevin - 2.00 0.00 0.00 B Map
Yorkshire 30W10 Caretorp Almund Almund 'of Rylstone' - Roger the Poitevin - 2.00 0.00 0.00 B Map
Total               11.00 0.00 0.00  

Profile

It is not certain whether the name given in the Yorkshire folios as Almund and Almunt stands for Æthelmund or Ealhmund. If Æthelmund, the name was rare enough in DB, and the location of the West Riding estates isolated enough, for identification with one of the handful of other Æthelmunds to be impossible. If Ealhmund, he was perhaps the same person as the Ealhmund who had a house in York. Since Rylstone is 40 miles from the city, the likelihood that a relatively modest thegn whose estates were so far up country owned urban property there is not high.

The two different spellings of the name map on to two different successors in 1086, and in theory we might be dealing with two different Almunds, but geography tells in favour of their common identity. Hartlington in Wharfedale was less than 5 miles across the fells from Rylstone, with Arnford and its berewicks some 10 miles further west, across into Ribblesdale. Almund’s estate was split up after 1066 not because there were two Almunds but because Ribblesdale was given en bloc to Roger the Poitevin.

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