PASE: Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon England

Domesday

[Image: Excerpt from the Domesday Book]
[Image: Durham Liber Vitae, folio 38r (extract)]

Agemund 9 Agemund priest of St Michael’s, Lincoln, fl. 1086

Male
Author: CPL
Editorial Status: 4 of 5

  Discussion of the name  

Summary

           

Agemund 9 was evidently the parish priest of St Michael’s church in Lincoln, and thus owned the church’s ½ carucate in Riseholme just outside the city. It was worth 10 shillings in 1066 and 5 shillings in 1086.

Distribution map of property and lordships associated with this name in DB

List of property and lordships associated with this name in DB

          

Holder 1066

Shire Phil. ref. Vill Holder 1066 DB Spelling Holder 1066 Lord 1066 Tenant-in-Chief 1086 1086 subtenant Fiscal value 1066 value 1086 value Holder 1066 ID conf. Show on map
Lincolnshire 68,47 Riseholme Agemund Agemund the priest - Agemund the priest, king's thegn - 0.50 0.50 1.00 B Map
Total               0.50 0.50 1.00  

Tenant-in-Chief 1086 demesne estates (no subtenants)

Shire Phil. ref. Vill TIC DB Spelling Holder 1066 Lord 1066 Tenant-in-Chief 1086 1086 subtenant Fiscal value 1066 value 1086 value TIC ID conf. Show on map
Lincolnshire 68,47 Riseholme Agemund Agemund the priest - Agemund the priest, king's thegn - 0.50 0.50 1.00 B Map
Total               0.50 0.50 1.00  

Profile

   

The Agemund who held ½ carucate at Riseholme barely 2 miles north of Lincoln along Ermine Street was explicitly a priest who survived the Conquest and was listed among the king’s thegns in 1086. He was thus distinct from the prominent Lincoln lawman Agemund 7. The DB entry adds that the land in question ‘belongs to the church of St Michael’, which can be plausibly identified as the Lincoln parish church of that name (Hill 1948: 130). Agemund can thus be presumed the parish priest of St Michael’s. He farmed his small holding at Riseholme with one plough in 1086.

Bibliography

    

Hill 1948: J. W. F. Hill, Medieval Lincoln (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1948)

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