PASE: Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon England

Domesday

[Image: Excerpt from the Domesday Book]
[Image: Durham Liber Vitae, folio 38r (extract)]

Beornweald 12 Beornweald ‘of Each’ (Kent), fl. 1066

Male
Author: CPL
Editorial Status: 4 of 5

Discussion of the name

Summary

          

Beornweald 12 was a small landowner in east Kent whose single yoke of land was worth 12 shillings.

Distribution map of property and lordships associated with this name in DB

List of property and lordships associated with this name in DB

           

Holder 1066

Shire Phil. ref. Vill Holder 1066 DB Spelling Holder 1066 Lord 1066 Tenant-in-Chief 1086 1086 subtenant Fiscal value 1066 value 1086 value Holder 1066 ID conf. Show on map
Kent 5,216 Each Bernoltus Beornweald 'of Each' Edward, king Odo, bishop of Bayeux Osbern fitzLetard 0.50 0.60 0.80 A Map
Total               0.50 0.60 0.80  

Profile

   

The name Beornweald occurs only once in DB, as the owner of one of two small estates at Each, a mile or so west of the royal borough and port of Sandwich. Both manors comprised 1 yoke of land and were worth only a few shillings; the other one does not have its TRE owner recorded in DB (Kent 5:212). They presumably corresponded to the later hamlets and manors of Upper Each (now Each) and Nether Each (now Each End) but there is no means of deciding which Each was which (Hasted 1797–1801: X, 123–4).

Sandwich had a population of perhaps a couple of thousand, must have had extensive cross-Channel trading connections, and must have been supplied with foodstuffs from a hinterland which included Each. In light of those circumstances, the owner of Each may well have been a burgess of Sandwich rather than a rich peasant; and if he was a burgess he may well have had the Continental name Bernald rather than the English name Beornweald, though the latter remains a safer bet.

Bibliography

    

Hasted 1797–1801: Edward Hasted, The History and Topographical Survey of Kent, 2nd edn, 12 vols (1797–1801)

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