PASE: Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon England

Domesday

[Image: Excerpt from the Domesday Book]
[Image: Durham Liber Vitae, folio 38r (extract)]

Beorhtsige 48 Beorhtsige ‘of Tresparrett’ (Cornw.), fl. 1066

Male
Author: CPL
Editorial Status: 4 of 5

  Discussion of the name  

Summary

Beorhtsige 48 was a small landowner in north Cornwall whose three holdings amounted to 1 hide worth 27 shillings.

Distribution map of property and lordships associated with this name in DB

 

List of property and lordships associated with this name in DB

Holder 1066

Shire Phil. ref. Vill Holder 1066 DB Spelling Holder 1066 Lord 1066 Tenant-in-Chief 1086 1086 subtenant Fiscal value 1066 value 1086 value Holder 1066 ID conf. Show on map
Cornwall 5,7,7 Tresparrett Brixi Beorhtsige 'of Tresparrett' - Robert, count of Mortain Jovin 0.50 0.60 0.60 A Map
Cornwall 5,7,8 Treblary Brixi Beorhtsige 'of Tresparrett' - Robert, count of Mortain Jovin 0.25 0.25 0.50 A Map
Cornwall 5,7,10 Dizzard Brixi Beorhtsige 'of Tresparrett' - Robert, count of Mortain Jovin 0.25 0.50 0.25 A Map
Total               1.00 1.35 1.35  

Profile

 

Three small manors set close to one another in north Cornwall were very probably held by a single Beorhtsige who was not represented elsewhere. The central manor of the three was Tresparrett, standing at 650 ft with moorland reaching over 800 ft, a mile or two inland above the little valley of the river Valency. Four miles to the north was Dizzard, on the cliffs beyond Cambeak headland; 4 miles to the south and further inland was Tremblary, almost at the head of the valley of the Inny, flowing eastwards off the moors towards the Tamar. This little group of moorland and clifftop hamlets had land for 10 ploughs and 400 acres of pasture. Beorhtsige 48’s estate was too far (at 50 miles) from the single manor assigned to Beorhtsige 47 in north Devon for the two men to be identical. Nor is it at all likely that he was the minor 1086 tenant of the count of Mortain in the Lizard, 50 miles in the other direction (Beorhtsige 49).

Return to PASE Domesday homepage
Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon England

© 2016 King's College London