PASE: Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon England

Domesday

[Image: Excerpt from the Domesday Book]
[Image: Durham Liber Vitae, folio 38r (extract)]

Brun 18 Brun Priest, ‘of Cadwell’ (Oxon.), fl. 1066x1086

Male
Author: CPL
Editorial Status: 4 of 5

  Discussion of the name  

Summary

Brun 18 was a priest who held 3 virgates of land in south Oxfordshire directly from King William in 1086 and had held the same land before 1066. Its value rose over that period from 20s. to 30s.

Distribution map of property and lordships associated with this name in DB

List of property and lordships associated with this name in DB

Holder 1066

Shire Phil. ref. Vill Holder 1066 DB Spelling Holder 1066 Lord 1066 Tenant-in-Chief 1086 1086 subtenant Fiscal value 1066 value 1086 value Holder 1066 ID conf. Show on map
Oxfordshire 14,4 Cadwell Brun Brun the priest, 'of Cadwell' - Brun the priest, 'of Cadwell' - 0.75 1.00 1.50 A Map
Total               0.75 1.00 1.50  

Tenant-in-Chief 1086 demesne estates (no subtenants)

Shire Phil. ref. Vill TIC DB Spelling Holder 1066 Lord 1066 Tenant-in-Chief 1086 1086 subtenant Fiscal value 1066 value 1086 value TIC ID conf. Show on map
Oxfordshire 14,4 Cadwell Brun Brun the priest, 'of Cadwell' - Brun the priest, 'of Cadwell' - 0.75 1.00 1.50 - Map
Total               0.75 1.00 1.50  

Profile

Brun the priest was listed among the ‘other clerks’ who held land direct from King William in Oxfordshire in 1086. He had 3 virgates at Cadwell, a small place on one of the streams below the Chiltern escarpment, and had held the same land before 1066.

Cadwell was later reckoned a tithing in the parish of Brightwell Baldwin (Lewis 1831: I, 300), but it is not certain that Brun was the parish priest of Brightwell. The nineteenth-century parish boundary between Brightwell and its northern neighbour Chalgrove follows a course which suggests that Cadwell was originally a separate territory which was eventually added to Brightwell (Kain and Oliver 2001: nos. 29/286–7 and 294). In any case, Brun is more likely to have been a king’s priest, perhaps based at a minster church, rather than a local parish priest.

Bibliography

Roger J. P. Kain and Richard R. Oliver, Historic Parishes of England and Wales: An Electronic Map of Boundaries before 1850 with a Gazetteer and Metadata (Colchester: History Data Service, 2001)

Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England, 4 vols (London: S. Lewis and Co., 1831)

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